Gwynedd

Beaumaris CastelBeaumaris Castel

This is undoubtedly the ultimate "concentric" castle, built with an almost geometric symmetry. Conceived as an integral whole, a high inner ring of defenses is surrounded by a lower outer circuit of walls, combining an almost unprecedented level of strength and firepower. Before the age of cannon, the attacker would surely have been faced with an impregnable fortress. Yet, ironically, the work of construction was never fully completed, and the castle saw little action apart from the Civil War in the 17th century. Read More...

Beaumaris Eye

Beaumaris is gearing itself up to offer Anglesey residents and visitors to the Island a once in a lifetime opportunity to see the world from a different perspective with the “Beaumaris Eye” which comes to town from Saturday 26 May to Saturday 9 June. The Giant Wheel, which at 35 metres high and with 24 gondolas each taking six passengers, will open up everyone’s eyes with views across the Island, down the Menai Strait, over to Caernarfon and Llandudno as well as the Snowdonia Mountain Range. Read More...

Beaumaris Pier

The pier currently attracts between 600 and 1,000 people a day, during school holidays crab fishing is very popular with children. The new landing pontoon has been designed to be removable during the winter months so that the structure can be relocated to a safer location due to the risk of storm or extreme weather damage Read More...

Caernarfon Castel

Mighty Caernarfon is possibly the most famous of Wales's castles. Its sheer scale and commanding presence easily set it apart from the rest, and to this day, still trumpet in no uncertain terms the intention of its builder Edward I. Begun in 1283 as the definitive chapter in his conquest of Wales, Caernarfon was constructed not only as a military stronghold but also as a seat of government and royal palace. Read More...

Menai Strait

For centuries, travel to Anglesey from the mainland was often hazardous. Ferries traversed the Menai Strait at various places, but the currents are tricky and numerous boats capsized or ran aground, often with loss of life. Read More...

Welsh Highland Railway

The trains - hauled by the world's most powerful narrow gauge steam locomotives - climb from sea level to over 650ft on the foothills of Snowdon, before zig-zagging dramatically down the steep hillside to reach Beddgelert, nestling in the heart of the National Park, then through the magnificent Aberglaslyn Pass and on to PorthmadogRead More...

 

Portmeirion

Clough Williams-Ellis built Portmeirion from 1925 to 1975 on a peninsula off the coast of Snowdonia to show how 'the development of a naturally beautiful site need not lead to its defilement'. He fought for Beauty - "that strange necessity". Portmeirion is owned by a Registered Charity called The Second Portmeirion Foundation and managed by Portmeirion Limited Read More...

 

Beddgelert

Just south of the village of Beddgelert (Gelert's Grave), following the footpath along the banks of the Glaslyn, you will find Gelert's Grave. According to legend, the stone monument in the fields, marks the resting place of "Gelert" the faithful hound of the medieval Welsh Prince Llywelyn the Great. Read More...

 

Harlech

Spectacularly sited Harlech Castle seems to grow naturally from the rock on which it is perched. Like an all seeing sentinel, it gazes out across land and sea, keeping a watchful eye over Snowdonia. Read More...

 

Snowdonia National Park

Snowdonia National Park covers 823 square miles of the most beautiful and unspoilt countryside in North Wales. It is an area where people live and work but also where thousands come to relax and enjoy a wide range of leisure activities.Read More...

 

The table of place names above is not an extensive list, and will be updated as I visit new places and take more photographs.